The Law of Perpetual Transmutation at Work

The Law of Perpetual Transmutation is one of the most powerful concepts I’ve ever learned for effecting significant life changes. Understand it, use it, and your desired improvements become predictable. It is a dependable law of nature as described in chapter one of Hidden Treasures: Heaven’s Astonishing Help with Your Money Matters (a free download). 

Certified Mentor and Mindset Mastery Program Honors Graduate Robyn Young shares one of her experiences with the Law of Perpetual Transmutation. She writes:

Let’s break it down:

Perpetual: occurring continually, continuing forever

Trans- (prefix): so or such as to change or transfer

Mutation: a significant and basic alteration

In other words, continuing and ongoing change. The Law of Perpetual Transmutation states that everything is coming into or moving out of a physical form. It is evident in the physical world around us, such as in the water cycle. But it also pertains to thought: those thoughts that we give time, energy, and emotion to are the thoughts that will become physically manifest in our lives.

Early in our marriage, my husband decided that he wanted to attend graduate school in another state. At the time, we owned a home. We had purchased it with a federally subsidized loan that stipulated that this home had to be our primary residence. Since we were leaving the state, we had to sell it.

Although we planned to return after my husband’s graduate studies, we couldn’t rent the home out, or even leave it vacant for the 18 months we’d be gone. The housing market at that time was good, and homes in our area were selling, on average, in about four months. But by the time we were informed that my husband had been accepted into his graduate program, we were only two months away from the start of school. We had to sell the house faster than average.

It was possible, but would it happen for us?

Back then I knew nothing of the Law of Perpetual Transmutation. I didn’t know that having a dream and believing in the realization of it as if it had already happened would actually change the circumstances around me to be favorable to my desired outcome. But as a natural law, I did not have to understand it to be subject to it.

My husband and I did know, however, that if we were to accomplish this goal of selling our home, it would be because of our faith, not because of anything we could do to make our home sell in a specific period of time. We did what things were in our control—we beautified the yard and the interior, and we hired a realtor to sell for us.

The day we hired our realtor I actually struggled with that decision. I knew I was relinquishing control of the situation to someone who did not feel the same urgency about selling my home that I did. Mine was not the only home she was responsible to sell. I felt I had to do everything in my power for this dream to become reality, but would my agent work as hard as I would have?

I remember the realization that while I could not control the situation directly, I could increase my efforts to do the things I believed God wanted me to be doing. So I increased the frequency and sincerity of my prayers. I studied the scriptures every day. I served in my church, making special efforts to do my best with the assignments I had been given. And I believed.

Sometimes a negative thought would pop into my mind: “What if it doesn’t sell? Then what?” But I knew. My husband had a good job. If we couldn’t sell our home, we’d just stay. We liked our life as it was. It would be okay.

But after having those thoughts, I knew, I KNEW in my gut that the house would sell. So my “negative” moments always ended with, “But it will sell.” And I knew it would.

Four weeks before we left for graduate school, we closed on the sale of our home. The entire process had taken only one month. Although I knew nothing of the laws of prosperity, I knew that the work that had happened in our minds was a key part of what had happened in our lives. And now I know that believing in the idea, holding it there, and trusting God to take care of the things I could not control was exactly what I needed to do so that our dream could manifest itself in a physical form.

It was the Law of Perpetual Transmutation at work.

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Robyn Young is a Mindset Mastery Program Honors Graduate and Certified Mentor.

Click here to learn more about Robyn.

Click here to learn more about the Mindset Mastery Program.

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Silencing the “Shoulds”

I have a love/hate relationship with the word “should.” The thoughts running through my head often follow this pattern:

“I should clean the kitchen.”

“I should speak nicely to my dog (or children, or spouse, etc.).”

“I should finish that project I started.”

“I should turn off the television.”

I should, I should, I should… That’s the hate part of the relationship, the part I use as a measuring stick that always leaves me falling short.

Then there is the love part of the relationship:

“Please just tell me what I should do, and I’ll do it!”

It’s not just me with this struggle, I know. It’s a societal infection. We live in a world where, from the time we are five years old (or sometimes younger), we are put on a path that is entirely outlined for us:

“You should go to school, you should get good grades, you should participate in lots of activities, you should go to college, you should get a good job, and you should look forward to retirement!”

What if all the “shoulds” don’t bring the happiness you expect or want?

There are even “shoulds” for that:

“You should go back to school and find a career better suited for you.”

“You should find a hobby that you really love to do.” Or, for the really desperate,

“You should abandon your entire, stifling life and start over with something you love.”

Isn’t there another possibility?

Do you remember what it feels like to dream? You may have to go back pretty far. What do you want to be when you grow up? Is it the same thing you wanted to be when you were four? We start on the “should” path so early that we may have to remember that far back to find our inner dreamer again. I finally realized that in order to get what I want, I need to define it-write it down in great detail. But then the battle begins: What should I want? It is so ingrained in me that instead of wondering what I actually want, I start dreaming within the “shoulds.”

How do you rediscover that ability to dream and create? How do you get in touch with what makes your heart sing? How do you silence the “shoulds” and follow your path?

Develop your spirituality. Spend time in prayer, meditation, and with good, inspirational literature. Develop a personal relationship with God. Learn to identify when He is speaking to you. Keep a journal of your spiritual progress.

Love yourself.

In the New Testament Jesus said “Thou shalt love thy neighbor as thyself.” Loving yourself is a prerequisite to loving others! I’m not talking about indulging your every whim, I’m talking about being patient with yourself, forgiving yourself. Be compassionate with yourself. Speak kindly to yourself. See all the goodness and potential within you-you are more amazing than you could possibly realize! Ask God to help you see yourself in this way.

Discover your talents. Start by playing. Pay attention to the experiences that provide the feelings you are seeking: peace, joy, fulfillment. And trust your instincts. Your idea of “play” may not look like playing to someone else.

Trust that the experiences of your life are clues to your self-discovery. Which events and people in your life are most difficult for you? These are gifts! There is something for you to learn from every difficult experience! Do you look for lessons in these kinds of experiences, or do you try to escape? Looking for the lesson is hard, but learning from the experience brings you closer to what you want: peace, joy, fulfillment.

Dream. Start to create the life you want in your mind. It doesn’t have to seem possible; in fact, if what you really want seems impossible, it’s even more important to create and nurture that dream! Pay particular attention to the feelings you want to experience: energetic, excited, relaxed, easy-going, flexible, fulfilled, at peace, confident…add whatever feelings are important to you. Then start to believe in the possibility of that dream.

There will be things you should do. But who is telling you what those “shoulds” are? Be the creator of your life. The “shoulds” will vanish, and a path to your ideal life will start to form. You’ll know what you need to do as you learn to listen to what your soul is telling you.

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Robyn Young is a Mindset Mastery Program Honors Graduate and Certified Mentor.

Click here to learn more about Robyn.

Click here to learn more about the Mindset Mastery Program.

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Why I no longer have “bad” days

I love learning. I find it exhilarating. Most of my learning over the past few years has been self-improvement oriented, and that has been the most exciting, most empowering learning of all.

I have noticed a pattern, however. I find myself enjoying everything I’ve learned, applying new principles in my life, and feeling really good for a few days. And then I find myself in a slump. I start to feel sluggish, irritated, and short-tempered. I used to be really bothered by those days. I fought them. I tried to deny that they were happening. I was even critical of myself because of them: I was feeling so good, why didn’t it last? What is wrong with me for why I keep slipping back into a struggle?

I realized the other day that it’s the Law of Rhythm. Just like the ebb and flow of the ocean, our lives have rhythm. We see patterns. For everything there is a season, but not always the same season. It is not always summer. Eventually, summer gives way to fall, then winter. But spring comes, and then summer again. We can count on it. Life is the same. We have good days, we have bad days. But like the seasons, the bad days don’t last forever. By law.

I noticed something else about the rhythm of my life. As I have learned about the laws of thought and tried to live by them, my down days look a lot different than they did before. I am gentler with myself. I am kinder to my family. I speak in a softer tone. I am more patient and loving. I have more control over my emotions and reactions. I am recognizing my own progress. The visual image I have for my life is no longer a wavy horizontal line that shows ups and downs extending over time. Now I see a wavy line that is steadily climbing upward. I still experience downs, but they are higher than my downs used to be.

I’ve decided that I will no longer have “bad days.” Instead, I experience “rhythm days.” They may look the same to other people, but there is definitely a difference. I am the difference. Now I know that the challenging days are just that-a brief period of time that has an end and will give way to something better. And the challenges I face today will help to shape my better tomorrow. For every down, there is an up. I can count on it. By law.

Related: Hidden Treasures: Heaven’s Astonishing Help With Your Money Matters

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Making the Choice

I was talking to my sweet daughter the other day. She is of an age and a temperament that makes not getting her way an absolutely miserable experience. I was trying to help her through a particularly upsetting disappointment, when she asked me the $64,000 question: “How can I be happy when I’m just NOT?!”

Admittedly, I have been struggling with the same question—I, who have studied and taught principles that lead to happiness! So when I found myself answering her question, I knew the answer was a gift from my Heavenly Father, an answer that was as much for me as it was for her.

The answer consisted of three choices:

  1. Choose to be happy;
  2. Choose to be flexible;
  3. Choose to be grateful.

First, there is power in making a choice. The opportunity and ability to be happy is always present, but it requires that we make a choice to lay hold upon those gifts. Making that choice literally bestows upon you the power to think differently, the power to initiate change in your attitude first, and then in your circumstances. YOU are the agent of change in your life, and change of any kind begins with a CHOICE.

Choosing to be happy in the face of disappointing circumstances can be difficult. It requires that you view life and happiness from a long-term perspective. For instance, will this particular circumstance alter your happiness five or ten years from now? It could, if you choose to become bitter about the disappointment, but what if you get your way? Will having things go as you desire them to make you happier in the future? Sometimes this is a difficult question to answer. But learning to see things from a long-term perspective, learning to believe in the possibility of happiness even if we don’t get our way now is a skill, one that can be learned, practiced, and developed.

Choosing to be flexible is a partner to choosing to be happy. Sometimes happiness requires flexibility. Life is full of surprises. If we determine that our happiness is dependent upon a particular outcome, with all the possible variables, we can be setting ourselves up for failure. Choosing to be happy is
incomplete without its companion—flexibility.

Most important is gratitude. Recognizing the fact that there is much to be grateful for in spite of disappointing circumstances is the key that makes happiness and flexibility possible. Gratitude changes our perspective. Gratitude opens our eyes to the reality of the blessings and abundance all around us, even if we previously only saw lack. Whenever disappointment or depression sets in, start with gratitude. It will turn everything around.

My daughter, true to her age and temperament, dismissed these ideas, telling me that she had heard that the opposite was true. Her teacher had told her of a boy who was assigned to write about his future life. He was required to re-write and revise it until it became very detailed. When he grew up, he discovered that every detail in that assignment was fulfilled in his life. How can you be flexible when you’re supposed to be specific?

It was a question I had asked myself. If the achievement of a goal requires such specificity that you can see it and feel it before it happens, where does flexibility come in? Again, the answer came to me as a gift. I asked her if she had ever been driving, and had to take a detour. Detours come when, for some reason, the route we are traveling cannot get us safely to our destination. In spite of how inconvenient they sometimes seem, they are intended to get us safely to our destination when our originally planned route will not. How effective would it be to reach a detour sign and, rather than follow it, throw a tantrum about not being able to use the route you had planned? Sometimes the detours take longer than we had planned. But if we keep following them, trusting in the fact that they are helping us get to where we want to go, we will eventually arrive. Without flexibility, however, we would find ourselves stuck at a roadblock with no hope of getting to our desired destination.

I have had the experience in the past year of not achieving many of my goals. It has been discouraging to see what I want, and then have everything NOT turn out. But what I have realized is that the goals that I didn’t achieve were goals that were the means to my end—my preferred route, so to speak, to get my ultimate goal of life fulfillment and happiness. I haven’t failed because I haven’t achieved, rather, the experiences of this year have helped me to identify and clarify what I want most, and helped me to see that sometimes not getting what I want now is really helping me to get what I want later. Originally published February 9, 2013

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